Friday, December 03, 2021

Review of Feldman, The Story of Sacrifice

ANCIENT JEW REVIEW: Book Note | The Story of Sacrifice (Ethan Schwartz).
Liane M. Feldman. The Story of Sacrifice: Ritual and Narrative in the Priestly Source. FAT 141. Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck, 2020.

... Feldman’s new reading of P boldly takes on two of the most entrenched dichotomies in biblical studies: (1) ritual vs. narrative, and (2) literature vs. history. While I do not think that she has fully overcome these dichotomies, she has raised crucial questions about them. ...

The author of the book has published her own summary of the PhD thesis version at AJR, which I noted here. And AJR also published a series of essays on the published book. See here and links.

Visit PaleoJudaica daily for the latest news on ancient Judaism and the biblical world.

Zoom event: Hempel on the DSS and Palestinian Judaism

H-JUDAIC: EVENT: Lecture "The Dead Sea Scrolls and the Contours and Texture of Palestinian Judaism" by Professor Charlotte Hempel (December 14, 2021).

Sponsored by the Parkes Institute for the Study of Jewish/non-Jewish Relations (University of Southampton), this event is free but requires pre-registration. Details are at the link.

Visit PaleoJudaica daily for the latest news on ancient Judaism and the biblical world.

News on Hobby Lobby and Obbink

VARIANT READINGS: Update on Hobby Lobby vs. Obbink Case (Brent Nongbri).

I am surprised by this outcome. It sounds as though we won't be learning more from the court case after all. We'll see.

For more on Hobby Lobby's lawsuit against Dirk Obbink, accusing him of selling them stolen artifacts, see here and here. Follow the links in the first of those posts for more on the Oxford missing-papyri scandal and its alleged connections with Obbink and Hobby Lobby.

Visit PaleoJudaica daily for the latest news on ancient Judaism and the biblical world.

Thursday, December 02, 2021

Hanukkah and Daniel 11

FOR HANUKKAH: The Lead up to Chanukah in the Book of Daniel (Prof. Lawrence M. Wills, TheTorah.com).
An ancient pious scribe describes in apocalyptic visions, the history of the conflict between Judea and Antiochus Epiphanes, but fails to dream that the Maccabees, a political group of guerrilla fighters, will win.
This doesn't seem to be a new essay, but I haven't linked to it before.

For more on Daniel chapter 11, see the posts here and here, which link to Phil Longs posts at Reading Acts, along with my commentary and links.

For more on the Seleucid dynasty, with special attention to their coins and with many cross-references to Daniel 11, see here and here and links. For the Ptolemaic dynasty likewise, see here and links.

Visit PaleoJudaica daily for the latest news on ancient Judaism and the biblical world.

Fake "Archaic Mark"

THE ETC BLOG: SBL Presentation on "Archaic Mark" (GA 2427) (Tommy Wasserman).

For more on the fake Archaic Mark manuscript, see Stephen Carlson's important 2006 essay, which I noted here.

Although there were doubts early on, it took almost 70 years to establish decisively that the manuscript was a forgery. Forgers have continued to improve their products. Who knows how many forgeries are being treated as geniune ancient manuscripts and inscriptions today? I suspect there are some.

Visit PaleoJudaica daily for the latest news on ancient Judaism and the biblical world.

Ahiqar in Syriac and Arabic

THE AWOL BLOG: Ahiqar - The Story of Ahiqar in its Syriac and Arabic Tradition. Looks like a useful online edition.

For more on the story of Ahiqar (Ahikar), see here, here, and here and links.

Cross-file under Old Testament Pseudepigrapha Watch,

Visit PaleoJudaica daily for the latest news on ancient Judaism and the biblical world.

Wednesday, December 01, 2021

Biblical Studies Carnival 189

THE DUST BLOG: Biblical Studies Carnival number 189 (Bob MacDonald). A thorough carnival. And I don't just say that because it links to PaleoJudaica so many times. Although that doesn't hurt!

UPDATE (2 December): Bad link now fixed.

Visit PaleoJudaica daily for the latest news on ancient Judaism and the biblical world.

Zoom event: Dr. Sarah Sallon on reviving ancient date palms

H-JUDAIC: EVENT: "Reviving The Ancient Judean Date Palm" with Dr. Sarah Sallon (December 7, 2021) (Azrieli Institute of Israel Studies). Follow the link for details. The event is free but requires preregistration.

For PaleoJudaica posts on the work of Dr. Sallon and her colleagues on resurrecting the ancient Judean date palm, start here and follow the links.

Visit PaleoJudaica daily for the latest news on ancient Judaism and the biblical world.

Zillionth Hellenistic-era oil lamp excavated in Israel!

HANUKKAH ARCHAEOLOGY: 2,000-year-old oil lamp comes to light in City of David. While such lamps are common finds in excavations, it is "truly exciting" to dig up a Hasmonean-era artifact just before Hanukkah, archaeologists say (Yori Yalon, Israel HaYom). HT Rogue Classicism.

Nice lamp.

If this is now the Hanukkah archaeology news, I suspect that we have seen all the big announcements for this season.

Visit PaleoJudaica daily for the latest news on ancient Judaism and the biblical world.

Tuesday, November 30, 2021

Zoom event on Fraade's new Oxford Commentary on the Damascus Document

THE CSCO BLOG: Book Launch Event: The Oxford Commentary on the Dead Sea Scrolls: The Damascus Document by Steven Fraade.

The event takes place on 16 December. It is free, but requires preregistration.

The commentary came out earlier this month. Cross-file under New Book.

Visit PaleoJudaica daily for the latest news on ancient Judaism and the biblical world.

The rediscovery of lost works of Philo and Eusebius in Armenian

ROGER PEARSE: The rediscovery of Philo, Eusebius’ Chronicon in Armenian.

The initial publication of the texts in the early nineteenth century involved some retrospectively entertaining scholarly rivalry.

For more on Armenian Philo, see here, here, and here. The last link collects earlier post on the ancient Armenian literary tradition more generally. Cross-file under Armenian Watch.

Visit PaleoJudaica daily for the latest news on ancient Judaism and the biblical world.

Oesterreich, Kognitionswissenschaftliche Perspektiven auf biblische Visionserzählungen (Brill)

NEW BOOK FROM BRILL:
Kognitionswissenschaftliche Perspektiven auf biblische Visionserzählungen

Kognitionswissenschaftliche Perspektiven auf biblische Visionserzählungen

Am Beispiel der Verklärung (Mk 9,2–9)

Series: Biblical Interpretation Series, Volume: 196

Author: Nicole Oesterreich

Das vorliegende Buch bietet einen umfassenden Beitrag zum Bestreben neuro- und kognitionswissenschaftliche Erkenntnisse in die neutestamentliche Exegese zu integrieren. Für dieses Vorhaben eignen sich veränderte Bewusstseinszustände insbesondere, da sie auf allgemein menschlichen Strukturen des Gehirns beruhen und in sehr vielen Kulturen Teil der religiösen Praxis waren und sind. Anklänge daran finden sich auch in biblischen Visionserzählungen. Die Untersuchung bietet neben einer Einführung in die Philosophie des Geistes und notwendigen naturwissenschaftlichen Grundlagen sowie einer hermeneutischen Reflexion eine breit angelegte Darstellung der antiken Erfahrungen mit veränderten Bewusstseinszuständen anhand ihrer Induktionsrituale. Die gewonnenen Erkenntnisse werden dann auf die Verklärungserzählung angewendet.

____________________________________

This book is a comprehensive contribution to the ongoing effort to integrate findings in cognitive science into New Testament studies. Altered states of consciousness are particularly suitable for this attempt as they are a common human property and a widespread religious practice. This study contains an introduction to the basics of philosophy of mind and cognitive studies as well as a hermeneutical reflection. The wide portrayal of ASCs in ancient religious contexts according to the type of induction rituals provides the historic context for the cognitive analysis of the Transfiguration narrative.

Copyright Year: 2022

Prices from (excl. VAT): €139.00 / $167.00

E-Book (PDF)
Availability: Published
ISBN: 978-90-04-49981-2
Publication Date: 25 Oct 2021

Hardback
Availability: Published
ISBN: 978-90-04-49975-1
Publication Date: 21 Oct 2021

Visit PaleoJudaica daily for the latest news on ancient Judaism and the biblical world.

Monday, November 29, 2021

Slingstone bearing name of Hasmonean-era baddie

HANUKKAH ARCHAEOLOGY: Sling stone from Hasmonean period found in southern Hebron Hills. The carved piece of ammunition bears the name of Seleucid leader Diodotus Tryphon and an emblem of the Greek god Zeus; find announced on 1st night of Hannukah (Times of Israel).
A lead sling stone bearing the name of a Seleucid leader who fought against the Hasmoneans was recently found in the southern Hebron Hills in the West Bank by the military’s Civil Administration’s Archaeology Unit.

While it was unclear when the item was found, the Civil Administration released it to the media on Sunday, the first day of the Hanukkah festival, which celebrates the Jewish victory over the Seleucid Empire during the Hasmonean period.

The ammunition had the name of Diodotus Tryphon — who reigned over the Seleucid Empire between 142 and 138 BC — inscribed on it in Greek.

[...]

The IAA seems to have been saving up Hasmonean-era discoveries to announce during Hanukkah. It will be interesting to see what else comes out this week.

For the rise and fall of Diodotus Tryphon ("Trypho"), see 1 Maccabees 11-15. Josephus also tell his story interspersed through Antiquities 13.131-224. Once again, it is left to a blogger to find some of the primary-source references for you. For a brief timeline of Tryphon's life, see here.

Visit PaleoJudaica daily for the latest news on ancient Judaism and the biblical world.

Hasmonean-era farm excavated in Tel Aviv

HANUKKAH ARCHAEOLOGY: Israel discovers 2,150-year-old Hellenistic farm in central Tel Aviv (Global Times).
Israeli archaeologists have unearthed the relics of a Hellenistic farm in the heart of the coastal city of Tel Aviv, dated to about 2,150 years ago, the Israel Antiquities Authority (IAA) said on Sunday.

[...]

Visit PaleoJudaica daily for the latest news on ancient Judaism and the biblical world.

Sanhedrin-era discoveries at Yavneh

STARTED AS SALVAGE ARCHAEOLOGY: First-Ever Remains of Sanhedrin Era Building Uncovered in Coastal City of Yavneh (TPS / Tazpit News Agency via the Jewish Press).
Israel Antiquities Authority (IAA) excavations being carried out on a massive scale in the city of Yavne have uncovered the first evidence there of a building from the time of the Sanhedrin – the supreme legislative Jewish assembly that went into exile to Yavne after the destruction of Jerusalem by the Romans, some 2,000 years ago.

The building contained fragments of chalkstone vessels, clear evidence that its occupants were observing Jewish laws of ritual purity. The excavation also discovered an impressive cemetery dating from the time of the Sanhedrin.

[...]

Note also the YouTube video to which the article links.

This excavation also found more than 150 glass vials in the cemetery, placed above some of the tombs. The excavation area is near the site of the Byzantine-era wine press excavated at Yavneh (Yavne), on which more here and here.

Visit PaleoJudaica daily for the latest news on ancient Judaism and the biblical world.

Sunday, November 28, 2021

Hanukkah 2021

HAPPY HANUKKAH (CHANUKKAH, CHANUKAH) to all those celebrating! The eight-day festival begins tonight at sundown.

Last year's Hanukkah post is here. It links to past Hanukkah posts with additional historical background. For PaleoJudaica posts in the last year that relate to Hanukkah, see here, here, here, here, here, here, here, here, here, here, here, and here.

Visit PaleoJudaica daily for the latest news on ancient Judaism and the biblical world.

How was Herod's Temple built?

BIBLE HISTORY DAILY: The Stones of Herod’s Temple Reveal Temple Mount History Ancient construction techniques evident in the Herodian Temple. Includes the full text of an old, but still informative, BAR article on the construction of Herod's Temple by Leen Ritmeyer.

Cross-file under Temple Mount Watch.

Visit PaleoJudaica daily for the latest news on ancient Judaism and the biblical world.

Review of Honigman et al. (eds.), Times of transition: Judea in the early Hellenistic period

BRYN MAYR CLASSICAL REVIEW: Times of transition: Judea in the early Hellenistic period.
Sylvie Honigman, Christophe Nihan, Oded Lipschitz, Times of transition: Judea in the early Hellenistic period. Mosaics: studies on ancient Israel, 1. University Park, PA: Eisenbrauns, 2021. Pp. 416. ISBN 9781646021147 $129.95.

Review by
Francesca Calabi, University of Pavia. calabi@unipv.it

Conclusion:
The book is very rich and complex. The breadth of its perspectives allows readers to have a look at many aspects of the topic. This is helpful, but at the same time the breadth of perspective and vastness of topics mean that the various articles are not always in dialogue with each other and a certain vagueness results. I found particularly interesting the theses on the functions and aims of the Greek Pentateuch by Martin Rösel, the chapter on retelling stories about Alexander by Konrad Schmid and Sylvie Honigman’s presentation of the emergence of apocalypses as a hermeneutical schift. But I believe all are useful for anyone who wishes to study these topics.

Visit PaleoJudaica daily for the latest news on ancient Judaism and the biblical world.

Saturday, November 27, 2021

Susa, the winter royal residence of the Persian Empire

TRAVEL: Susa: a gateway to must-see destinations (Tehran Times).
TEHRAN – In southwest Iran is situated Susa, a captivating UNESCO-listed archaeological site occupying the whole southern flank of modern Shush. Originally similar in scale to the UNESCO-designated Persepolis, the city saw countless invasions and sackings during its history which spans almost 6000 years.

Furthermore, Susa was once the winter residence of Persian kings after having been captured by Cyrus the Great. Susa became part of the Persian Empire under Cyrus II, the Great in 538 or 539 BC.

Various archaeological seasons in Susa have yielded ample relics including pottery, arms, ornamental objects, metalwork, bronze articles, as well as clay tablets. ...

HT Todd Bolen at the Bible Places Blog.

This article has good coverage of the history, biblical connections, and archaeology of Susa.

I was surprised to see how many PaleoJudaica posts there are on Susa. See here, here, here, here, here, here, here, and here.

While we are on Iranian archaeology, for more on the Persian ceremonial capital Persepolis, see here and many links. For more on the Median capital Ecbatana, which also served as the Persian summer royal residence and archive, see here.

Visit PaleoJudaica daily for the latest news on ancient Judaism and the biblical world.

The archive of Zenon

MEDIEVAL MANUSCRIPTS BLOG: The archive of Zenon. HT the AWOL Blog.

This post seems out of place in a blog on medieval manuscripts, but it's good to have it anyway. Zenon lived in Egypt and Palestine in the the third century BCE. For more on his vast archive, see here (but the links have rotted) and here.

Visit PaleoJudaica daily for the latest news on ancient Judaism and the biblical world.

Buntu, ... Divinity and Deification in Early Judaism (Gorgias)

NEW BOOK FROM GORGIAS PRESS:
THE LORD GOD OF GODS
Divinity and Deification in Early Judaism

By Silviu Nicolae Bunta

The investigation of this book into early Jewish experiences of God begins with calls to discard any categorical and definitional approaches to the literature of early Judaism, and several enduring preconceptions about its mysticism and theology (particularly the relegation of its mysticism to particular texts and themes, and the molding of its theology in the image of medieval and post-medieval Jewish and Christian monotheisms). With this abandonment, the symbolic language of early Jewish texts gives sharper contours to a pre-formal theology, a theology in which God and divinity are more subjects of experience and recognition than of propositions. This clarity leads the investigation to the conclusion that early Judaism is thoroughly mystical and experiences a theology which is neither polytheistic, nor monotheistic, but deificational: there is only one divine selfhood, the divinity of “God,” but he shares his selfhood with “gods,” to varying degrees and always at his discretion. With some important differentiations which are also introduced here, this theology undergirds almost the entirety of early Judaism—the Bible, post-biblical texts, and even classical rabbinic literature. The greatest development over time is only that the boundaries between God and gods become at once clearer and less rigid.

Publisher: Gorgias Press LLC
Availability: In stock
SKU (ISBN): 978-1-4632-4333-3

Formats Hardback

Publication Status: In Print
Series: Perspectives on Hebrew Scriptures and its Contexts 35
Publication Date: Aug 24,2021
Interior Color: Black
Trim Size: 6 x 9
Page Count: 357
Language: English
ISBN: 978-1-4632-4333-3

Price: $114.95
Your price: $68.97

Visit PaleoJudaica daily for the latest news on ancient Judaism and the biblical world.