Saturday, May 29, 2021

Tigay & Berlin (eds.), The Posen Library of Jewish Culture and Civilization (Yale)

NEW BOOK FROM YALE UNIVERSITY PRESS:
The Posen Library of Jewish Culture and Civilization, Volume 1
Ancient Israel, from Its Beginnings through 332 BCE

Edited by Jeffrey H. Tigay and Adele Berlin

The Posen Library of Jewish Culture and Civilization, Volume 1, covers the earliest period of Jewish civilization, from the second millennium BCE through 332 BCE. Organized by genre, this book presents a collection of some of the earliest products of Jewish culture, including extensive selections from the Tanakh and the Hebrew Bible; extrabiblical inscriptions and documents by and about Israelites and Jews, found by archaeologists in the lands of Israel, Egypt, and Mesopotamia; and images representing the visual culture of ancient Israel. Combining genres that have never been presented together in a single publication, Volume 1 illustrates ancient Israel’s cultural innovations and commonalities with neighboring societies.

Format: Hardcover
Price: $175.00

ISBN: 9780300135503
Publication Date: March 23, 2021
600 pages, 8 x 10
140 color illus. + 149 b/w illus.

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Knoppers, Prophets, Priests, and Promises (Brill)

NEW BOOK FROM BRILL:
Prophets, Priests, and Promises

Essays on the Deuteronomistic History, Chronicles, and Ezra-Nehemiah

Series: Vetus Testamentum, Supplements, Volume: 186

Author: Gary N. Knoppers
Editors: Christl M. Maier and Hugh G. M. Williamson

Shortly before his untimely death Gary Knoppers prepared a number of articles on the historical books in the Hebrew Bible for this volume. Many had not previously been published and the others were heavily revised. They combine a fine attention to historical method with sensitivity for literary-critical analysis, constructive use of classical as well as other sources for comparative evidence, and wide-ranging attention to economic, social, religious, and political circumstances relating in particular to the Persian and early Hellenistic periods. Knoppers advances many new suggestions about significant themes in these texts, about how they relate one to another, and about the light they shed on the various communities’ self-consciousness at a time when new religious identities were being forged.

Prices from (excl. VAT): €120.00 / $144.00

E-Book (PDF)
Availability: Published
ISBN: 978-90-04-44489-8
Publication Date: 03 May 2021
Copyright Date: 01 Jan 2021

Hardback
Availability: Published
ISBN: 978-90-04-44485-0
Publication Date: 15 Feb 2021
Copyright Date: 01 Jan 2021

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Review of Flower & Ludlow (eds.), Rhetoric and religious identity in late antiquity

BRYN MAYR CLASSICAL REVIEW: Rhetoric and religious identity in late antiquity.
Richard Flower, Morwenna Ludlow, Rhetoric and religious identity in late antiquity. Oxford; New York: Oxford University Press, 2020. Pp. 304. ISBN 9780198813194 $100.00.

Review by
Jaclyn Maxwell, Ohio University. maxwelj1@ohio.edu

Mostly the essays address Christianity and paganism. But some glance at Judaism and one is about rhetoric in the Manichaean Kephalaia.

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Evans & Johnston (eds.), Scribes and Their Remains (T&T Clark)

NEW BOOK FROM BLOOMSBURY (T&T CLARK):
Scribes and Their Remains

Editor(s): Craig A. Evans, Jeremiah J. Johnston

Published: 05-20-2021
Format: Paperback
Edition: 1st
Extent: 336
ISBN: 9780567700407
Imprint: T&T Clark
Series: The Library of Second Temple Studies
Illustrations: 182 b&w illustrations
Dimensions: 6 1/8" x 9 1/4"
List price: $39.95
Online price: $35.96
Save $4.00 (10%)

Paperback $35.96

Hardback $117.00

EPUB/MOBI eBook (Watermarked) $28.76

PDF eBook (Watermarked) $28.76

About Scribes and Their Remains

Scribes and Their Remains begins with an introductory essay by Stanley Porter which addresses the principal theme of the book: the text as artifact.

The rest of the volume is then split into two major sections. In the first, five studies appear on the theme of 'Scribes, Letters, and Literacy.' In the first of these Craig A. Evans offers a lengthy piece that argues that the archaeological, artifactual, and historical evidence suggests that New Testament autographs and first copies may well have remained in circulation for one century or more, having the effect of stabilizing the text. Other pieces in the section address literacy, orality and paleography of early Christian papyri.

In the second section there are five pieces on 'Writing, Reading, and Abbreviating Christian Scripture.' These range across numerous topics, including an examination of the stauros (cross) as a nomen sacrum.

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Friday, May 28, 2021

Hammer, Akiva (JPS)

RECENT-ISH BOOK FROM THE JEWISH PUBLICATION SOCIETY:
Akiva
Life, Legend, Legacy

Reuven Hammer

272 pages
1 timeline

Hardcover
October 2015
978-0-8276-1215-0
$29.95

eBook (PDF)
(Requires Adobe Digital Editions)
October 2015
978-0-8276-1275-4
$29.95

eBook (EPUB)
(Requires Adobe Digital Editions)
October 2015
978-0-8276-1248-8
$29.95

About the Book

The legendary Akiva ben Yosef has fascinated Jews for centuries. Arguably the most important of the Tannaim, or early Jewish sages, Akiva lived during a crucial era in the development of Judaism as we know it today, and his theology played a major part in the development of Rabbinic Judaism. Reuven Hammer details Akiva’s life as it led to a martyr’s death and he delves into the rich legacy Akiva left us.

That legacy played an extraordinarily important role in helping the Jewish people survive difficult challenges to forge a vibrant religious life anew, and it continues to influence Jewish law, ethics, and theology even today. Akiva’s contribution to the development of Oral Torah cannot be overestimated, and in this first book written in English about the sage since 1936 Hammer reassesses Akiva’s role from the period before the destruction of the Temple in 70 CE until the Bar Kokhba revolt in 135 CE. He also assesses new findings about the growth of early Judaism, the reasons why Akiva was so outspoken about “Christian Jews,” the influence of Hellenism, the Septuagint, and the canonization of the Hebrew Bible. Ultimately Hammer shows that Judaism without Akiva would be a very different religion.

This book was published back in 2015, but I missed it then. It seems worth noting.

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Remembering Eilat Mazar

MEMORIAL: Remembering Eilat Mazar, the archaeologist of Jerusalem. APPRECIATION: “I work with the Bible in one hand and the tools of excavation in the other,” Mazar said. “The Bible is the most important historical source and therefore deserves special attention.” (Edgar Leftovitz, Jerusalem Post).

Background here and here.

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"Nero got a bad rap" – NYT

EXHIBITION REVIEW: Rehabilitating Nero, an Emperor With a Bad Rap. He is known as a cruel tyrant who played his lyre while Rome burned. That’s exactly what his enemies wanted you to think, the curators of a new exhibition argue (Farah Nayeri, New York Times).

Background here and links.

This review may hint at an answer to a question I raised at the above link:

Nero also had to “find culprits” for the fire, so he went after a “Jewish subgroup,” later known as Christians, Mr. Opper explained. Nero became “the anti-Christ” to followers of what would become the West’s dominant faith, Christianity.
Does this paragraph imply that the exhibition also deals with the post-mortem Nero mythology? Or is that last sentence just a comment by the reviewer? Again, drop me a note if you see the exhibition and find out.

Visit PaleoJudaica daily for the latest news on ancient Judaism and the biblical world.

The Writing in the Dirt?

BIBLE HISTORY DAILY: Jesus’ Mysterious Message. (John Drummond).
According to the text (John 7:53–8:11), the episode takes place not in the streets of Jerusalem, but in the Temple courts—a much different setting to be sure, and one where a public execution would have been forbidden. We also know from the Temple Mount Sifting Project that the courts of the Temple were probably paved in geometric patterns of colorful marbles called opus sectile. In reality, there was probably little to no dirt at all for Jesus to stick his finger into and write mysterious messages for onlookers. As McGrath writes, “Wherever Jesus traced his finger through the dust of the Temple floor, whether tracing letters or the edges of tiles, his aim could not have been to communicate something through specific words he wrote. Nothing he wrote that way could have been legible.”
As the excerpt hints, this essay is a summary of an article by Professor James McGrath in the current issue of Biblical Archaeology Review.

I have a few comments on the proposed connection with the Sotah rite. I have not seen the full BAR article, which is behind the subscription wall. James may address these points there.

First, as everyone knows, John 7:53-8:11 is an independent passage that was secondarily added here in some manuscripts of John. Many manuscripts leave it out. In others it appears elsewhere in John or in various places in Luke. We don't know where it came from. Scholars tend to take it as a real incident in Jesus' life. Could be. It could also be entirely fictional. I don't see strong evidence either way.

Second, it's true that the episode is placed at the Temple. But how much can we infer from this? If it's a legend, we don't know if it preserves any memory of what the Temple court was like. It migh assume it had a dirt floor.

Third, all that said, the connection with the Sotah rite (Numbers 5:11-31) is intriguing. Jesus writes in or on the "dirt" (Greek gēn, γην). The Septuagint uses the same (granted very common) word in Num 5:17. Professor McGrath could be right. The catchword principle is arguably in play. I can't do better.

In any case, Jesus' writing on the ground has served as a marvelous koan for two thousand years.

By the way, this is a good excuse to mention James's new book, What Jesus Learned from Women (Cascade, 2021).

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Thursday, May 27, 2021

Simulated or simple divine speech?

PROF. BENJAMIN D. SOMMER: YHWH’s Simulated Speech: The Priestly Interpretation of Prophecy. (TheTorah.com).
The use of the unusual verb מִדַּבֵּר, middabber in Numbers 7:89 suggests that YHWH does not speak to Moses in the literal and simple sense.
A thought-provoking esssay. I have two thoughts on it.

First, this strange hitpa'el participle of the root dbr is only visible in the Masoretic vocalization. There is no indication of it in the consonantal Hebrew text. The ancient translations (the Greek Septuagint, the Syriac Peshitta, and the Latin Vulgate) translate it as a normal pi'el participle, "saying" or "speaking." They show no awareness of a hitpa'el vocalization. The origin of the intriguing Masoretic interpretation of the word is uncertain. I see no reason to think that it goes back to the Priestly composer of the passage.

Second, Numbers 7 has the reputation of being perhaps the most tedious chapter in the Bible. It takes 89 verses to tell us that, to celebrate the consecration of the tabernacle, each of the twelve tribes offered a large offering of precious metal vessels, oil and flour, and many different animals.

Each offering was identical. The chapter repeats every detail of each twelve times.

But hidden in the final verse is this word with a theologically deep vocalization. How's that for a bonus feature?

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Mazar memorial

BIBLE HISTORY DAILY: Remembering Eilat Mazar. Queen of Jerusalem Archaeology (Megan Sauter).

Background here.

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Álvarez-Pedrosa (ed.), Sources of Slavic Pre-Christian Religion

NEW BOOK FROM BRILL:
Sources of Slavic Pre-Christian Religion

Series: Numen Book Series, Volume: 169

Texts and Sources in the History of Religions, Volume: 169

Volume Editor: Juan Antonio Álvarez-Pedrosa

In Sources of Slavic Pre-Christian Religion Juan Antonio Álvarez-Pedrosa presents the original texts as well as English translations of all known medieval sources that inform us about the religion practiced by the Slavs before their Christianization. Since the Slavs did not have a written culture before their conversion to Christianity, all the texts were authored by people who were involved in this long process or in contact with the Slavs. For this reason, the texts come from a lengthy period from the ninth to the fifteenth century. Since the texts were originally written in seven different ancient languages, the present book is the result of the work of a large team of specialists.

Prices from (excl. VAT): €164.00 / $197.00

E-Book (PDF)
Availability: Published
ISBN: 978-90-04-44138-5
Publication Date: 12 Oct 2020
Copyright Date: 01 Jan 2021

Hardback
Availability: Published
ISBN: 978-90-04-44061-6
Publication Date: 15 Oct 2020
Copyright Date: 01 Jan 2021

Cross-file under Old Church Slavonic Watch.

Old Church Slavonic preserves any number of fascinating Old Testament pseudepigrapha and related texts. This book deals with Slavic religion before the arrival of Saints Cyril and Methodius and their great translation project.

I have been remiss this year in not noting two of the three saints days in honor of them, 14 February and 24 May. Happy belated celebrations of the invention of the Slavonic alphabet! There is another coming on 5 July.

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More Nero Reviews

THE BRITISH MUSEUM'S EXHIBITION ON NERO is getting a lot of attention. And it only opens today! Some recent reviews:

Bad reputation: British Museum takes new look at Rome's Nero (Jill Lawless, Phys.org)

Nero, British Museum, review: a provocative, revisionist take on Rome’s viper-in-chief (Alastair Sooke, The Telegraph, rpt. MSN).

So far I have seen no indication that the exhibition addresses the Nero rediturus myth (the rumor after his death that he was still alive and was coming back to become emperor again) or the Nero redivivus myth (the idea that he would rise from the dead at the end time to become the antichrist). Can anyone confirm or correct that?

Background here and links and here.

Visit PaleoJudaica daily for the latest news on ancient Judaism and the biblical world.

Wednesday, May 26, 2021

Eilat Mazar 1956-2021

SAD NEWS: Dr. Eilat Mazar, Queen of Jerusalem Archaeology, Has Died. Dr. Mazar leaves behind a rich legacy of biblically significant discoveries including the discovery of King David’s Palace, Nehemiah’s Wall, the Solomonic gate of Jerusalem, as well as numerous discoveries related to biblical figures (Watch Jerusalem).
Preeminent biblical archaeologist of Jerusalem, Dr. Eilat Mazar, died today at age 64, after a three-year battle with a serious illness. Dr. Mazar leaves behind a rich legacy of biblically significant discoveries including the discovery of King David’s palace, Nehemiah’s wall, the Solomonic gate of Jerusalem, as well as numerous discoveries related to biblical figures.

[...]

I am very sad to hear of Dr. Mazar's passing, especially at such an early age.

PaleoJudaica mentioned her often. For some posts on her and her work, see here and links and here. May her memory be for a blessing.

Visit PaleoJudaica daily for the latest news on ancient Judaism and the biblical world.

More on the ancient Judeans' fish diet

THE STORY ON THE NON-KOSHER FISH DIET OF ANCIENT JUDEANS has been receiving a lot of attention. A number of people had drawn my attention to the underlying article just published in the journal Tel Aviv. It is open access, so you can read it if you are interested in the details.
The Pentateuchal Dietary Proscription against Finless and Scaleless Aquatic Species in Light of Ancient Fish Remains

Yonatan Adlern & Omri Lernau
Pages 5-26 | Published online: 24 May 2021
Download citation https://doi.org/10.1080/03344355.2021.1904675

Abstract

The origins and early history of the pentateuchal prohibition against eating finless and scaleless aquatic species (Lev 11:9–12; Deut 14:9–10) has yet to merit a detailed investigation. The present study is an initiatory attempt to attend to this lacuna by analysing 56 zooarchaeological assemblages of fish remains from 30 sites throughout the southern Levant from the Late Bronze Age through to the end of the Byzantine period (ca. 1550 BCE to 640 CE). A central conclusion of the study is that consumption of scaleless fish— especially catfish—was not uncommon at Judean sites throughout the Iron Age and Persian periods. Unlike the pentateuchal prohibitions against eating pork, the ban against finless and scaleless aquatic species apparently deviated from longstanding Judean dietary habits. The pentateuchal writers appear to have legislated this dietary restriction despite the lack of an old and widespread dietary tradition at its root. This conclusion should encourage us to rethink commonly held assumptions that other pentateuchal dietary proscriptions emerged out of earlier dietary ‘taboos’.

If you want something less technical, Lina Zeldovich has published an informative article in Smithsonian Magazine: What Archaeology Tells Us About the Ancient History of Eating Kosher. A new study of fish remains deepens scholars’ understanding of how the dietary laws came to be.

Visit PaleoJudaica daily for the latest news on ancient Judaism and the biblical world.

A Talmudic-era amulet

APOTROPAIC ARTIFACT: Amulet against ‘evil eye’ offers look at Jewish life in Talmudic Israel. The artifact was uncovered some 40 years ago in the village of Arbel in the Galilee by one of its first resident, late Tova Haviv (Rossella Tercatin, Jerusalem Post).
Shaped as a triangle, on one side the pendant features the figure of a rider whose head is surrounded with a halo riding a horse. The rider is depicted in the act of throwing a sphere at a female figure on the ground, surrounded by the inscription in Greek reading “The One God who Conquers Evil.” Under the horse, the Greek letters I A W Θ appear, the equivalent of Jewish divine name of Y-H-W-H. The opposite side of the object presents an eye pierced by arrows and surrounded by dangerous animals – two lions, a snake, a scorpion and a bird – as well as another Greek inscription reading “One God.”
This is a remarkable artifact. See the article for a photo.

The IAA seem fully confident of the amulet's authenticity. Like many of our ancient amulets, this one was not found in a controlled excavation. There is a family tradition of its discovery forty years ago, but few details have been released. Perhaps predictably, I would like to see more information about the discovery and the authentication.

I have not seen the original press release. The only other coverage of the story I have seen so far is by the Jewish Press: 40 Years after Discovery, IAA Receives Ancient Amulet Bearing the Sacred Tetragrammaton. It has additional details and better photographs.

Visit PaleoJudaica daily for the latest news on ancient Judaism and the biblical world.

Book event essays (3): Feldman, The Story of Sacrifice

ANCIENT JEW REVIEW: When Moses Goes to Ikea: the Introduction of Systematic Sacrifice (Andrew McGowan).

Another essay on Liane Feldman's recent book, The Story of Sacrifice: Ritual and Narrative in the Priestly Source (Mohr Siebeck, 2020).

I noted the first essay in this series here and the second here.

Visit PaleoJudaica daily for the latest news on ancient Judaism and the biblical world.

Tuesday, May 25, 2021

Did the ancient Judeans keep kosher?

CULINARY ARCHAEOLOGY: Ancient Judeans ate non-kosher catfish, sharks. The biblical prohibition against finless and scaleless sea creatures emerged in spite of this consolidated habit (Rossella Tercatin, Jerusalem Post).
[Archaeologist Dr. Yonatan] Adler and the co-author of the study, Haifa University Prof. Omri Lernau, analyzed the data from some 56 fish bones assemblages found in 30 sites throughout the region and dating between the Late Bronze Age through to the end of the Byzantine period (ca. 1550 BCE to 640 CE).

The researchers demonstrated that the consumption of non-kosher fish was very common up until and including the Persian period (586 BCE-332 BCE).

The period of time covers centuries when a great part of the biblical narrative is believed to have taken place, the time of prophets and kings.

That implies that some (not all) of the kosher laws in Leviticus were innovations.

PaleoJudaica has been following Dr. Adler's work on archaeology and ritual purity for some time. See here, here, here, here, here, and here.

Visit PaleoJudaica daily for the latest news on ancient Judaism and the biblical world.

Book event essays (2): Feldman, The Story of Sacrifice

ANCIENT JEW REVIEW: Legal Discourse as World-Building (Hindy Najman).
In conclusion, I want to celebrate this book that teaches us how to love the priestly narrative. Feldman’s reading shows the whole and the parts of this narrative. For Feldman, the priestly narrative is a coherent and integrative work that is formative for ancient Judaism. ...
I noted the first essay in this series, with background information on the book, here.

Visit PaleoJudaica daily for the latest news on ancient Judaism and the biblical world.

Historical background of the Gaza conflict

NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC: Jerusalem's sacred sites are a combustible mix of religion and politics. Disputes over the fate of Jerusalem’s Palestinian neighbourhoods triggered the most recent spate of bloodshed (Andrew Lawler). From the Damascus Gate to the tomb of Sheikh Jarrah, Saladin's physician, to the Tomb of the Kings and the grave of a Roman centurion that was traditionally assigned to Simeon the Just. A court case concerning property disputes in the Sheikh Jarrah neighborhood led to protests there and at the Temple Mount. And the protests spread, leading to the Gaza conflict.

Let's hope the ceasefire holds.

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Review of "Nero: The Man Behind the Myth"

EXHIBITION: Nero At The British Museum: A Rome That Smacked Of Game Of Thrones. Nero, The British Museum ★★★★☆ (Tabish Khan, Londonist).
This sizeable exhibition doesn't cast judgement on Nero; it simply plies us with beautiful objects and fascinating insights, letting us come to our own conclusions on the man behind the myth.
The exhibition opens on 27 May.

Background here.

Visit PaleoJudaica daily for the latest news on ancient Judaism and the biblical world.

Monday, May 24, 2021

Orion Center Colloquium on "Fallen Beings"

ZOOM EVENT:
Orion Center International Colloquium
Tuesday, June 1, 2021
18:30–20:30 Israel time; 11:30 a.m.–1:30 p.m. EDT
"Beyond the Fall: Fallen Beings in Ancient and Medieval Literature"
Follow the link for the program and registration information.

Visit PaleoJudaica daily for the latest news on ancient Judaism and the biblical world.

The Sixth Annual Workshop on Jewish Magic and its Wider Contexts

ZOOM EVENT: The Sixth Annual Workshop on Jewish Magic and its Wider Contexts. Unfortunately I can't find a website for the event, but registration information is at the link. The event takes place on 3 and 6 June. From the flier, the program is as follows:

Thursday, 3 June (Israel time, GMT+ 3)
18:30 – 17:00
Marco Moriggi (Università di Catania):
Syriac Incantation Bowls and the Mesopotamian Context: A Glimpse into Christian-Jewish Cultural Interactions
Joseph E. Sanzo (Università Ca' Foscari Venezia):
P. Haun. III 51 (Suppl. Mag. I 23): Reflections on Materiality and Ritual Gesture in Late Antique Lived Religion
Korshi Dosoo (Universität Würzburg): Solomon in Coptic Magic

19:30 – 18:30
Break

20:30 – 19:30
Angelika Berlejung (Universität Leipzig):
Amulet or Votive? Outer Shape and inscription in Conflict in Some “Amulets" of the 1st Millennium BCE
Fritz Graf (Ohio State University): Magic and the Baths: A View from Gadara

Sunday, 6 June
18:30 – 17:00
Esther Eidinow (University of Bristol):
Some Thoughts on the Psychology of Ancient Greek Magic
Robert Daniel (Universität zu Köln): From Work on the Project Magica Levantina: New Curses from Syrian Antioch and Daphne
Richard Gordon (Universität Erfurt): Experimenting with Ambitious Formularies/Grimoires, Graeco-Egyptian and Other

19:30 – 18:30
Break

20:30 – 19:30
Gideon Bohak (Tel Aviv University) and
Rivka Elitzur-Leiman (Tel Aviv University):
Tyche and the Angels who Sit: Three Ancient Jewish Amulets.
Roy Kotansky (Independent Scholar): More Aramaic and Hebrew Words on Unpublished Greek Amulets

Organizers > Avigail Manekin-Bamberger, Gideon Bohak, Yakir Paz
Further information > Avigail Manekin-Bamberger: Avigail.Manekin@mail.huji.ac.il | Yakir Paz: yakir.paz@mail.huji.ac.il

Visit PaleoJudaica daily for the latest news on ancient Judaism and the biblical world.

Damm (ed.), Religions and Education in Antiquity (Brill)

RECENT BOOK FROM BRILL:
Religions and Education in Antiquity

Studies in Honour of Michel Desjardins

Series: Numen Book Series, Volume: 160

Editor: Alex Damm

Religions and Education in Antiquity gathers ten essays on teaching and learning in the contexts of ancient Western religions, including Judaism, early Christianity and Gnostic Christian traditions. Beginning with an overview of religious education in the ancient Near Eastern and Mediterranean worlds, editor Alex Damm and the contributors together demonstrate the mutual influence of religion and education on each other; the relevance of educational traditions in addressing (for instance) historical or exegetical issues; and the thoroughgoing importance of education to religious life across time and space in antiquity. Highly useful to scholars of religion, theology, classics and education, this volume affords a state of the art study on pedagogy and learning in ancient religious contexts.

Prices from (excl. VAT): €127.00 / $153.00

E-Book (PDF)
Availability: Published
ISBN: 978-90-04-38461-3
Publication Date: 22 Oct 2018
Copyright Date: 01 Jan 2018

Hardback
Availability: Publishedv ISBN: 978-90-04-38443-9
Publication Date: 01 Nov 2018
Copyright Date: 01 Jan 2018

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BAR Summer 2021

BIBLE HISTORY DAILY: Biblical Archaeology Review, Summer 2021. In homes May 28th, 2021. With memorials to the late founding editor Hershel Shanks and lots of other articles.

Visit PaleoJudaica daily for the latest news on ancient Judaism and the biblical world.

Sunday, May 23, 2021

Lasine, Jonah and the Human Condition (T&T Clark)

NEW BOOK FROM BLOOMSBURY (T&T CLARK):
Jonah and the Human Condition

Life and Death in Yahweh’s World

By: Stuart Lasine

Published: 05-20-2021
Format: Paperback
Edition: 1st
Extent: 184
ISBN: 9780567700605
Imprint: T&T Clark
Series: The Library of Hebrew Bible/Old Testament Studies
Illustrations: 2 bw illus
Dimensions: 6 1/8" x 9 1/4"
List price: $39.95
Online price: $35.96
Save $4.00 (10%)

Paperback $35.96

Hardback $108.00

EPUB/MOBI eBook (Watermarked) $28.76

PDF eBook (Watermarked) $28.76

About Jonah and the Human Condition

Stuart Lasine examines all aspects of the human situation and condition in Yahweh's cosmos as depicted in the Hebrew Bible. As his starting point Lasine uses the phrase “the human condition”, which has been used to describe features of existence with which every person must cope, in ways which vary according to their culture, their situation within that culture, and their personality. In particular the most consistent factor that is basic to the human condition is mortality and, in the biblical context, the sometimes difficult relationship between the creator God and humankind. An examination of this forms the basis of Lasine's study, which draws analytical tools from several disciplines, including literary theory, psychology and philosophy.

In the first part of the book Lasine examines a number of relevant biblical texts which display different aspects of the human condition. Part two engages in a detailed case study of one human life-situation, that of the prophet Jonah. Finally, Lasine draws together his conclusions about life and death in Yahweh's cosmos, both for characters within the world of the scriptural text and for present-day readers of the Hebrew Bible.

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Mitternacht & Runesson (eds.), Jesus, the New Testament, and Christian Origins (Eerdmans)

NEW BOOK FROM EERDMANS:
Jesus, the New Testament, and Christian Origins
Perspectives, Methods, Meanings

Dieter Mitternacht and Anders Runesson, eds.
Foreword by David E. Aune

HARDCOVER; Published: 2/25/2021
ISBN: 978-0-8028-6892-3
Price: $ 65.00
730 Pages
Trim Size, in inches: 7.5 x 9.5

DESCRIPTION

An introduction to the New Testament in its historical context, with an overview of interpretative approaches and exegetical exercises

In this up-to-date introduction to the New Testament, twenty-two leading biblical scholars guide the reader through the New Testament’s historical background, key ideas, and textual content. Seminarians and anyone else interested in a deep understanding of Christian Scripture will do well to begin with this thorough volume that covers everything from the historical Jesus to the emergence of early Christianity. The contributors stress the importance of Christianity’s emergence within and from Second Temple Judaism.

Unique to this book is a special focus on interpretative methods, with several illustrative examples included in the final chapter of various types of scriptural exegesis on select New Testament passages. Readers are guided through the hermeneutical considerations of a historical text-oriented reading, a historical-analogical reading, a rhetorical-epistolary reading, argumentation analysis, feminist analysis, postcolonial analysis, and narrative criticism, among others. These practical, hands-on applications enable students to move from an abstract understanding of the New Testament to a ready ability to make meaning from Scripture.

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Jackson-McCabe, Jewish Christianity (Yale)

NEW BOOK FROM YALE UNIVERSITY PRESS:
Jewish Christianity
The Making of the Christianity-Judaism Divide

Matt Jackson-McCabe

A fresh exploration of the category Jewish Christianity, from its invention in the Enlightenment to contemporary debates

For hundreds of years, historians have been asking fundamental questions about the separation of Christianity from Judaism in antiquity. Matt Jackson-McCabe argues provocatively that the concept “Jewish Christianity,” which has been central to scholarly reconstructions, represents an enduring legacy of Christian apologetics. Freethinkers of the English Enlightenment created this category as a means of isolating a distinctly Christian religion from what otherwise appeared to be the Jewish culture of Jesus and the apostles.

Tracing the development of this patently modern concept of a Jewish Christianity from its origins to early twenty-first-century scholarship, Jackson-McCabe shows how a category that began as a way to reimagine the apologetic notion of an authoritative “original Christianity” continues to cause problems in the contemporary study of Jewish and Christian antiquity. He draws on promising new approaches to Christianity and Judaism as socially constructed terms of identity to argue that historians would do better to leave the concept of Jewish Christianity behind.

Format: Hardcover
Price: $65.00

ISBN: 9780300180138
Publication Date: June 23, 2020
328 pages, 6 1/8 x 9 1/4

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Gregory goes apocryphal

APOCRYPHICITY: Apocryphal Traditions in Gregory of Tours’ Glory of the Martyrs. Tony Burke gives us a précis of his forthcoming article on apocryphal traditions in one of the work of the sixth-century historian Gregory of Tours. Gregory has stories about the apostles, Mary the mother of Jesus, and a woman who collected some of John the Baptist's blood as a holy relic.

Cross-file under New Testament Apocrypha Watch.

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